NEW THIS WEEK AT THE SHOP:

A very busy week leads off with some larger, very anticipated releases. The Chris Robinson Brotherhood continue to reward their rabid fanbase with another huge volume of live recordings. 'Betty's Blends Volume 4' collects performances from right here in the midwest on a sprawling 4LP set. It only took a few listens here at SD HQ for us to declare Makaya McCraven's 'Universal Beings' our top jazz album of the year, and at last we have it on vinyl, in a splendidly artworked 2LP package. The late great Chris Cornell gets his due with his first ever career retrospective, in the house on CD, deluxe CD box, and super deluxe box. Purchases of any format here come with a beautiful lithograph portrait of Cornell while supplies last.
Perennial favorites Mumford & Sons are back with a new album called 'Delta', and the indefatigable Smashing Pumpkins return with 3/4s of their original lineup for a new record called 'Shiny And Oh So Bright. On again, off again supergroup The Good, The Bad and the Queen (Damon Albarn, Paul Simenon of the Clash, Tony Allen, and friends) revive themselves for 'Merrie Land', available on limited green vinyl, and we've got new albums from Mark Knopfler, Dispatch, and Andrew McMahon

We have an always welcome new record from Chicago folk-rock scamp Ryley Walker and (bear with me now) this one is a disc of Dave Matthews Band covers. Whatever you think of the DMB, or their underappreciated early 20th century jam sessions dubbed 'Lillywhite', let it pass from your mind for now, as this disc showcases yet another side of a seemingly infinitely reinventable persona in the young Walker, seeing him lend jazzy folk inflections ala early Sea and Cake or fuzzy realness ala 'AM' era Wilco to these tunes of the Bard Dave. On the same note are two lovely archival releases from the Big Thief camp, the first a disc of unreleased music from the group's songwriters Adrienne Lenker and Buck Meek, and the second a vinyl reissue of Lenker's debut solo album 'Hours Were The Birds', which is a gorgeous set of wintry folk tunes heavy with imagery.

Timeless rarities return to vinyl this week in a big way. 'In A Mood' was the second album from the late 80s Atlanta jazz musician Harry Case, and it's lived quite a life in the Discogs wantlists of rare groove diggers for years. It's easy to see why; no specific genre really sums this one up. It's jazz in the sense that Wally Badarou's 'Echoes' is jazz; a polyphonic world of pastel synths, guitar and rhythm boxes, with light touches of vocal soul and yearning funk that undoubtedly made it a tough sell back in the Reagan era. It's been nearly a decade since Ted Lucas' lost self-titled mid-70s album was pressed to vinyl for the first time, and in that span, copies have become rarer than many records three or four times older. 'Ted Lucas' sets the bar for long-lost holy grails extremely, maybe even impossibly high, and truly begs the question why it wasn't ever released in the first place. Check out opener 'It's So Easy' (you might find it familiar as it's turned up in a couple films and advertisements over the years) and find yourself immediately won over by by Lucas' dusty, oaken croon and laid-the-hell-back guitar delivery, and then settle in for an easy trip that will have you winding that tonearm back for hours to come. The first pressing of this did not last long so tuck in for one of these quick. Same goes for the 1973 self titled album from Joao Gilberto, which heaped further critical acclaim upon the already established don of bossa. With the aid of minimalist, hypnotic production from none other than Wendy Carlos, this LP was dubbed GIlberto's 'White Album'. It's also nice and white.
Timeless rarities return to vinyl this week in a big way. 'In A Mood' was the second album from the late 80s Atlanta jazz musician Harry Case, and it's lived quite a life in the Discogs wantlists of rare groove diggers for years. It's easy to see why; no specific genre really sums this one up. It's jazz in the sense that Wally Badarou's 'Echoes' is jazz; a polyphonic world of pastel synths, guitar and rhythm boxes, with light touches of vocal soul and yearning funk that undoubtedly made it a tough sell back in the Reagan era. It's been nearly a decade since Ted Lucas' lost self-titled mid-70s album was pressed to vinyl for the first time, and in that span, copies have become rarer than many records three or four times older. 'Ted Lucas' sets the bar for long-lost holy grails extremely, maybe even impossibly high, and truly begs the question why it wasn't ever released in the first place. Check out opener 'It's So Easy' (you might find it familiar as it's turned up in a couple films and advertisements over the years) and find yourself immediately won over by by Lucas' dusty, oaken croon and laid-the-hell-back guitar delivery, and then settle in for an easy trip that will have you winding that tonearm back for hours to come. The first pressing of this did not last long so tuck in for one of these quick. Same goes for the 1973 self titled album from Joao Gilberto, which heaped further critical acclaim upon the already established don of bossa. With the aid of minimalist, hypnotic production from none other than Wendy Carlos, this LP was dubbed GIlberto's 'White Album'. It's also nice and white.

More exquisite moods from the continent of Africa this week, starting off with two lovely LPs from Bonga. The Angolan singer performs a style called semba, a kind of latin-influenced rhythmic folk that also turned up in some Colombian music of the same period. A couple of Bonga tracks have turned up on compilations here and there, but these albums have never been available as full LPs since their original release. The Awesome Tapes From Africa label launches another spiritual bomb into the stratosphere with a set of early recordings by Ethiopian harpist and singer Asnakech Worku. "Ethiopian Icon' is haunting, raw and elliptical, with engaging accompaniment from none other than ATFA MVP Hailu Mergia. The Sublime Frequencies label delivers another missive from the cultural fringes with a new record by balafonist Baba Commandant and his band, and its a real smoker.

But that aint all. Check out more elctronic wonders from Dopplereffekt, an incredible new buffet-style album from Max Graef called 'Lo Siento Mucho Pero No Hablo Tu Idioma', an entrancing new one from the Romanian duo Khidja, plus new EPs from Mall Grab and Little Dragon, and a profound new effort from longtime staff fave Prefuse 73 under a new alias, Reto A Ichi.

New delights from Japan this week include an LP repress of the dropdead gorgeous late 80s ambient album 'Reminiscence' by pianist Motohiko Hamase, a repress of the first album from the Mkwaju Ensemble, the band led by vibraphonist Midori Takada, and a lush, Stereolab gone Acid Mothers style new record from the group Kikagaku Moyo, called 'Masana Temples'.

On the heels of the release of his lost 1963 sessions, Impulse delivers a 3 CD set compiling ALL of John Coltrane's recordings from that year, allowing the listener to take in the full scope of his accomplishments in that year alone. It's been 50 years since the release of the Rolling Stones' 'Beggars Banquet' and its back with its original RSVP cover wrapping and a vinyl version packed full of goodies. Kate Bush's early albums get the remaster treatment on two individual LP sets and one large CD set.

Jewels from the ambient wing of Brian Eno's palatial discography are back in print this week: 'Music For Airports', 'On Land', and the often overlooked but just as essential 'Discreet Music'.

Big things in rap world this week, starting off with some demanded LPs. Travis Scott's cosmic trap epic 'Astroworld' and Drake's radio-dominating 'Scorpion' are at last here on vinyl, as well as a repress of Gucci Mane's early classic 'Trap House'. On the CD end of things we have new stuff from Mariah Carey, Lil Yachty and Teyana Taylor.

More deep cuts restored to wax this week include the fiery spiritual jazz meets spoken word cauldron that is Amiri Baraka's 'Its Nation Time'. 80s funk group California Flight Project never saw their records make it past the demo stage during their initial existence, but thats been rectified by diehards more recently, and now we have it all on a single LP. Truly flawless, sundrenched and cosmic boogie funk here. The Be With Records label tucks another disco grail under their belt with the reissue of Marti Caine's one of a kind 1981 album 'Point Of View', which crosses up femme disco with bits of reggae and funk.

New jazz releases this week include the vinyl for Moses Boyd's incredible latin and funk influenced album 'Displaced Diaspora', and CD only affairs from Florian Weber and Gabriel Zucker.

Coil's late-period landmark ambient album 'The Ape of Naples' is back in print after last years repress disappeared in a matter of days. The 90s dark ambient masterpiece 'Stalker' by Robert Rich and Lustmord is on vinyl for the first time ever. The galactic jewel of 90s IDM known as B12's 'Time Tourist' is back in the house in an expanded edition on both CD and LP.

Speaking of IDM, the mysterious French label Melodies Souterraines has another cryptic compilation of rare 12" only cuts from the 90s and 00s that traces a delicate history of lesser appreciated electronic music and plays out like a loving mixtape made by the most knowledgeable DJ of all time. They've also brought us a compilation of early 80s material by the British art commune known only as Chen Yi, which sounds of a piece with music being made by likeminded groups like Throbbing Gristle, SPK, and Cabaret Voltaire. Glaswegian record savant JD Twitch has compiled a killer set of German art-punk for Strut called 'Kreaturen Der Nacht'.